Tips On How To Set Up Your Mountain Bike Tire Pressure

setting your nountain bike tyre pressure

For maximum control over your mountain bike while riding, it is essential that you have the appropriate amount of pressure in your tires. If you set the pressure too high your tires will have insufficient contact with the ground, which makes the bike more difficult to control.On the other hand, if you set the pressure too low, the tires can become unpredictable and they’ll also be more prone to pinch flats

The right amount of pressure for tires on mountain bikes will naturally vary among riders and also be determined by the tire setup for that particular bike. Other factors that come into play would have to do with the type of terrain and trail conditions you’ll be riding on.

Work Out The Tyre Pressure For Your Bike

The key to determining what the exact tire pressure should be for you and your tire setup would be to test various tire pressures out in normal conditions. Once you determine the optimum pressure for normal riding conditions, you can better adjust your tire pressure for the different types of terrain and trails as needed.

The first step is to find a good reliable pressure gauge or an air pump with a good pressure gauge. Once you obtain this gauge or air pump then keep it with you so that you use the same one each time you make an adjustment. Gauges are known for being highly inaccurate, so if you use different ones, it will be very difficult to maintain the appropriate tire pressure.

You Need A Reliable Pressure Gauge

When you start out, set the tire pressure at the higher end, at about 40 – 50 psi. However, if you have tubeless tires, you should start lower, at about 30 – 40 psi. Another factor is your body weight. If you weigh more, use a higher tire pressure to start with. Try riding around with this pressure for a while, just to get a feel for how your tires are taking corners and handling loose dirt.

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Then try dropping the pressure in each tire by 5 psi and take the bike out again to get a sense for how the tires react with this new setup. See if you can tell the difference from how the bike felt at the previous setting. You can expect to notice a bit more stability, but if you don’t then try dropping the tire pressure another 5 psi.

Then try dropping the pressure in each tire by 5 psi and take the bike out again to get a sense for how the tires react with this new setup. See if you can tell the difference from how the bike felt at the previous setting. You can expect to notice a bit more stability, but if you don’t then try dropping the tire pressure another 5 psi.